June 2016

THE LAY OF ANGOR IS HERE! BUY SIGNED COPIES OF THE COMPLETE TRILOGY IN PAPERBACK FOR ONLY £9.99 plus P+P DIRECT FROM HERSTORY!

I got even more excited as we approached the trench (above left) and I spotted a team of TBS volunteers hard at work in the finds-processing tent (above right). Alas, it turned out that the material they were working on had come from another of Tim's sites in Cambridgeshire, while Old London Road had yielded little more than an old ceramic marble - nothing connected with the battle, and nothing to definitively date the road to any period (which isn't really surprising, considering that the trench was only some 25 square metres cut across several miles of track! The road itself at that point - a gravel surface flanked by kerb-stones - wasn't Roman or medieval, but consistent with the 18th century turnpike known to have existed there from the historical record (above centre). In some respects this was disappointing; but as ever in archaeology, what you don't find can be as interesting as what you do, and the excavation has thrown up a whole load more questions which I hope that Tim's ongoing research will answer one day: like why this section of Old London Road follows this particular route up a steep-ish hill rather than taking the more direct, flatter way corresponding with the edge of the barley field on the left of the top image. Meanwhile it's great to know that the re-surfacing will go ahead, because having a safe, dry, flat road will be a great boon for the local community and the thousands of people who now come to walk the Towton Battlefield Trail every year.

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